Monday, July 4, 2016

Beautiful Australia ~ Ayres Rock/Uluru and the Olgas

Hello dear friends,

Welcome back to our Northern Territory road trip.
After leaving Kings Canyon, we headed to the Olgas and Ayres Rock.

Along the way we stopped for a toilet break  at a car park on the side of the road. There were some Major Mitchell cockatoos enjoying a drink.




And a lone dingo.

She was hungry...

And thirsty.
Poor thing.

We arrived at the Olgas later that day.
It was overcast while we were there.


I loved this shade area.

 These benches are awesome don't you think?

 A walk through the Olgas.




 The next day we saw
The Big Rock!

Ayres Rock/Uluru at Sunset.

 We had the best seats in the house!

And the Rock at Sunrise. 
There was no sun on this morning but the cloud on the top looked spectacular.

The Olgas in the distance covered in clouds.


 Another view of the rock.

Look closely, you can see people climbing the rock.



We enjoyed our time here, and spent four days looking around this area.

Did we climb the rock?
We tried.

I went as far as chicken corner. You can see it in the pic above. This is the first stop before reaching the chain and this is where I chickened out! Hubby went up a bit further but it became too steep for him too!

Has anyone climbed Ayers Rock?
I did when I was sixteen years old, but I have lost my nerve now that I am older J

See you soon,

xTania

18 comments:

  1. You're a great photographer Tania - these shots really capture the brightness of the light, big sky and the ochres

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    1. Thank you Phil. A good camera helps. There are many beautiful colours in the NT :)

      xTania

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  2. We have hills like that but no rocks that large. We also have Ayers who settled here as well. Such a neat place, lucky you are close enough to visit.

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    1. Ayres Rock is amazing to see. It is so huge, the photos don't do it justice, it is so much better.

      That's interesting about the name Ayers being in your area too.

      xTania

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  3. I'm no longer able to walk much, but I still enjoy the photos of such places.

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    1. This is why we are travelling now Gorges, while we are still able to walk and climb to see everything. I can imagine not being able to do it when we are older :)

      xTania

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  4. Isn't it stunning!!! I visited all the places you went to about 20 years ago (pre children) I almost chickened out while climbing the rock, I literally had to slide up backwards on my bottom to get to the chain! Once I was at the chain I felt safe because I had something to hold on to. I'm glad to see you can still climb it, I know the Aboriginal people don't like it being climbed, but I thought they had actually stopped it all together. I wish to return there one day and walk the base.

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    1. Hubby sat and slid up on his bottom to reach the chain too, it was the only way he could do it.

      The Aboriginal people do ask you not to climb the rock as a mark of respect. But it is not banned. Not yet, it could very well happen in the future though.

      We didn't walk the base, we too will need to return to do that :)

      xTania

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  5. Wow Tania! Your photos are fantastic. We went to the Rock a few times, well over 20 years ago. Hubby was there when the pubs and camping grounds were all around the base of the Rock. I got to the top of the chain and simply could not let go. That was as far as I got. Being unable to let go of the chain meant there were no photographs. I do remember the startling beauty and majesty of the area.

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    1. Haha Jane, you sound like me. I remember(aged 16) getting to the end of the chain and couldn't go any further.

      We camped at the base of the rock back in the 70's too.

      xTania

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  6. Great photos, Tania. You've always had a knack for writing a good post. Needs more lizards though! ;-)

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    1. Thank you Harry.

      Sorry for the lack of lizards Harry. Our favourites are in hibernation at the moment and with the temperatures we are having at the moment, I might just join them!

      Once the weather warms up again in August the lizards will reappear :)

      xTania

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  7. Great photos of a wonderful trip Tania. Did you camp, caravan? We caravaned up there a couple of years ago and absolutely love the outback. Uluru is a powerful place isn't it? We were accompanied by an Indigenous friend so we walked the 12kms around the bottom but didn't attempt to climb out of respect for our friend and his people.

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    1. We took a caravan Sally.

      Uluru definitely is powerful. I can understand your choice not to climb out of respect for the indigenous people, it is very important to them :)

      xTania

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  8. Oh my goodness Tania. What memories you've created! Visiting Uluru remains on my bucket list. We've yet to get there, but you've inspired me. What a wonderful trip! Mimi xxx

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    1. You really must do it Mimi, it was the best experience ever!

      xTania

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  9. It looks like a great trip, Tania. I was last at Uluru in the mid-1970s. The road in was just a dirt track then and no one there when we arrived. It was absolutely breathtaking.

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    1. We would have been at the rock around the same time as you then Rhonda. I went on a trip with my parents in the mid 70's. Things have definitely changed since then. It is very commercialized now.

      xTania

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I love reading your comments! Through them, I have learnt that there are some truly lovely people out there. Thank you :)